FarmSmart 2017

FarmSmart 2017 Presentations are now available in pdf format located at  2017 FarmSmart Presentations.

 

farmsmart-brochure-2017-page2FarmSmart 2017 is here.

Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017

Rozanski Hall, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON

Registration:  8:30 am, register by going to our registration site https://farmsmartconference.com/registration  or call 1-877-424-1300.

Program starts: 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Session times and location are in the FarmSmart Bochure (pdf)

To help plan your day check inside our brochure for the sessions you wish to attend.

Sponsorship and tradeshow spaces are available.  Sponsorship/tradeshow application package information is available here.  To register your company and book your space for the Tradeshow click here.

Feature Speakers- 1:20 – 2:30 pm:

Rozansk 2 – “Antimicrobial Use in Agriculture – Resistance From Both Society and Microbes”TAMcAllister - PSAE Portrait 1 - 30May2014.jpg

Dr. Tim McAllister, Principal Research Scientist, Ruminant Nutrition & Microbiology,  AAFC

Plant and animal agriculture use antimicrobials to control diseases in production.  However, agriculture is also close to losing its social licence on that use as we’ve known it.  What are the facts, and what is the fiction on antimicrobial resistance (AMR)?  Who is to blame, animal agriculture or human medicine?  What will we all do if we lose these products either by failed effectiveness or damaged social licence?  How does this matter compare to the other issues affecting agriculture’s social licence and sustainability?”  Dr. McAllister, who is among Canada’s most influential agricultural scientists will take this and many more questions about AMR and other challenges to agriculture head on!”

Tim McAllister was raised on a mixed cow-calf operation in Innisfail, Alberta. He obtained his M.Sc. in Animal Biochemistry at the University of Alberta and his Ph. D. in rumen microbiology and nutrition from the University of Guelph in1991. After a NSERC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary he had appointments in technical and biologist and scientists positions and was promoted to a Principal Research Scientist in 2005. Tim leads a diverse research team studying various areas of beef research. He has participated and lead projects that relate to antimicrobial resistance in beef cattle production systems since 1997. He also is leading project to develop the environmental footprint of beef, information that is key in supporting the beef industries social licence to operate and identifying where improvement in production practices can be implemented. Tim has authored over 600 scientific papers and is a recipient of the Pfizer Young Scientist Award, the Canadian Animal Industries Award in Extension and Public, the Elanco Award for the Production of Safe and Affordable Food and the Shurgain Award for Excellence in Meat Science and Nutrition and the American Feed Industry Research Award, Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal and the Governor General’s award for Excellence in the public service. His most recent achievement was as the recipient of the Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation. Tim spends his free time biking with his wife Kim and lab team in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere.

Rozanski 1 – Farmer Thinking: A Humorous Look at How The Voices of The Old Rural Community Still Speak to Us Today

dan-dexterDan Needles, Author and Playwright

Dan Needles is a writer who explores life where city and country meet. For 30 years his popular Wingfield Farm stage plays have filled theatres across Canada and the United States, including several seasons at the Stratford Festival and with Mirvish Productions in Toronto.

Dan has been nominated three times for the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour and won in 2003 for his history of mythical Persephone Township, With Axe and Flask. Vintage Canada/Random House released the complete collection of Wingfield stories, Wingfield’s World in 2011. This fall Douglas and McIntyre will publish a collection of his Harrowsmith magazine columns. He is now working on a Christmas musical for next year and continues as a regular columnist with Small Farm Canada, Farmers Forum and three Ontario regional magazines, On The Bay, In the Hills and Watershed.

Earlier this year, Dan was presented with the Order of Canada by the Governor-General for a body of work that celebrates rural Canada.

Beef Symposium – Rozanski 3

9:00 am – Public Trust in Food and Social Licence – What does it mean for your farm?

crystal-oct-2013b-581x600Crystal MacKay, Farm and Food Care Canada

Begin with the end in mind and find out what the latest research says about Canadian consumer attitudes towards beef farming and our food system. Then translate that to action. What can you do to address concerns and improve the public perception of agriculture.

Crystal is the CEO for Farm & Food Care Canada with a vision for building public trust in food and farming in Canada.  Farm & Food Care represents a coalition of farmers and associated businesses proactively working together with a commitment to provide credible information and strengthen sustainable food and farming for the future.  Crystal is a dynamic presenter who has delivered hundreds of presentations to a broad range of audiences from farmers to university students to CEOs across North America.  Crystal was raised on a farm in the Ottawa Valley.  She is a graduate of the University of Guelph, the Advanced Agricultural Leadership Program, and the George Morris Centre Executive Development Program.  She is a past President of the University of Guelph OAC Alumni Association, and a former director of both the Ontario 4-H Foundation and the Poultry Industry Council.  She enjoys spending time with her young family and playing hockey whenever she gets the chance!

10:05 am – Beef Industry of the Future

Dr. Tim McAllister, Principal Research Scientist, Ruminant Nutrition & tamcallister-psae-portrait-1-30may2014Microbiology,  AAFC

The sustainable beef industry of the future is dependent on technological collaboration both up and down the entire supply chain and not treating everyone like a competitor.

Tim McAllister was raised on a mixed cow-calf operation in Innisfail, Alberta. He obtained his M.Sc. in Animal Biochemistry at the University of Alberta and his Ph. D. in rumen microbiology and nutrition from the University of Guelph in1991. After a NSERC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary he had appointments in technical and biologist and scientists positions and was promoted to a Principal Research Scientist in 2005. Tim leads a diverse research team studying various areas of beef research. He has participated and lead projects that relate to antimicrobial resistance in beef cattle production systems since 1997. He also is leading project to develop the environmental footprint of beef, information that is key in supporting the beef industries social licence to operate and identifying where improvement in production practices can be implemented. Tim has authored over 600 scientific papers and is a recipient of the Pfizer Young Scientist Award, the Canadian Animal Industries Award in Extension and Public, the Elanco Award for the Production of Safe and Affordable Food and the Shurgain Award for Excellence in Meat Science and Nutrition and the American Feed Industry Research Award, Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal and the Governor General’s award for Excellence in the public service. His most recent achievement was as the recipient of the Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation. Tim spends his free time biking with his wife Kim and lab team in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere.

11:10 am – Adding Value from Pasture to Plate – A career in search of value 
KevinUnger.jpg

Kevin Unger, Lincoln County Feed Yards, Nebraska

Hear about Kevin’s journey in the cattle industry highlighted by his experiences at Decatur Feed Yard and the transition to the Lincoln County Feed Yard discerning value from data.anagement, rations, performance and carcass results of these cattle.

12:15 pm – Making Quality Beef from Holstein Cross Cattle

Brad Van Ravenswaay

Brad and his family currently finish 2,200 steers a year and have been feeding beef cross Holsteins and straight Holsteins for many years. They purchase beef cross calves, have them custom fed by local farmers and then finish them in their feedlot, and their Holstein calves are sourced in western Canada ready for their feedlot. Brad will discuss the management, rations, performance and carcass results of these cattle.

2:35 pm – Pain Management on Beef Farms – Practically painless

PhilMeadows.jpgDr. Phil Meadows, Mitchell Vet Services

Dr. Meadows will highlight new pain mitigation products and proper administration methods that will create less stress for your animals and you. This session will have you re-thinking your view on sensitive industry-approved procedures.

3:40 pm – Adding Value from Pasture to Plate – Are you ready for the next cattle cycle?

KevinUnger.jpgKevin Unger, Lincoln County Feed Yard, Nebraska

Applying technology, selecting for profit driving traits, management practices, inputs vs. outputs, value added services and a 50 thousand foot view.

Crops –

9:00 am  and 12:15 pm –  Rozanski 2 – Understanding How Precision Ag Works Regardless of Your Farm Size

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John Fulton, The Ohio State University

There are 3 primary precision ag data layers that need to be considered together: agronomic, machine and production data. Merging these layers can provide more accurate information on making farm input decisions.

John is an Associate Professor in the Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering Department at the Ohio State University. He leads the Precision Agriculture Program in CFAES and specializes in developing and evaluating technology or automated components related to application equipment to more accurately place and meet site-specific crop and soil needs. Through technology, John helps growers improve farm efficiency and increase crop yields in order to meet future world food demand while ensuring sustainability of the land they manage.

9:00 am – Rozanski 3 – Building A Controlled Traffic Farming System

Steve2017_steve_larcoque Larocque, Three Hills AB

Steve will discuss how he uses controlled traffic farming combined with no-till to build soil health, manage abiotic stress and apply precision ag technologies to improve yield and profitability. He will answer why he converted his farm to CTF, the impacts it’s made since he started in 2010 and the precision applications he applies inside a CTF system. Steve travelled the globe in search of controlled traffic farming systems during his Canadian Nuffield Scholarship. He will touch on the impact Nuffield has made to his farm, business, life and why you should consider applying this year.

Steve travelled the globe in search of controlled traffic farming systems during his Canadian Nuffield Scholarship. He will touch on the impact Nuffield has made to his farm, business, life and why you should consider applying this year.

Steve is an independent crop advisor based out of Three Hills, Alberta. As owner of Beyond Agronomy, he manages over 30,000 acres of cropland and publishes Beyond Agronomy News, a leading edge crop production and grain market newsletter. He is also a first generation grain farmer who farms north of Drumheller and one of the first to implement a full controlled traffic farming and inter-row seeding system in Western Canada.Steve has been working with producers for over fifteen years. He is a Certified Crop Advisor, has a diploma in Crop Advisory from Olds College and a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture from the University of Lethbridge. Steve is a 2007 Canadian Nuffield Scholar and spends much of the off season travelling internationally to speak to farm groups and scouring the globe for innovative crop production techniques to bring home to Western Canada.

9:00 am  & 12:15 pm – Rozanski 1 – Using Education and Collaboration to Promote Conservation Farming in an Urban Environment

2017_mike_starkeyMike Starkey, Brownsburg, IN

Learn how a no-till farmer grows corn and soybeans while dealing with urban encroachment and farming near a drinking water source. A look at how to make use of cover crops and no-till to control flooding and improve water retention.

The sixth generation Starkey family farm lies in an urban area just west of the metropolitan area of Indianapolis. Mike and his nephew, Jeff Starkey, operate the farm. They are joined by Mike’s son, Nick; Jeff’s son, Zach; and part-time employee AJ Adkins.

The Starkey family has the usual challenges of moving machinery in an area with heavy automobile traffic. And by farming in the School Branch watershed, Starkey Farms faces extra scrutiny. The School Branch stream is the third largest tributary feeding Eagle Creek reservoir, which is a primary drinking water source for Indianapolis.

Mike no-tills his cash crops and in the off-season he has cover crops growing in his fields.  He says both of these practices have virtually eliminated flooding on his fields, but improved water retention was enough to push him through the drought in 2012.
In addition, he says a university scientist has documented that due to his conservation practices, water leaving his farm is cleaner than what the stream water is that his farm fields empty into in.

Starkey may be a conservation success story, but he’s clear that he didn’t get there overnight, and he didn’t get there alone, “Input costs were skyrocketing, equipment costs were increasing, and I felt that my fertilizer was not being utilized.  I was applying so much that I wasn’t getting any benefit like I should have and my yields were plateauing. I had to make a change in order for the farm to financially survive.   With the help from other no-tillers to learn from and to see and discuss the positive and negative issues with no-till, it is critical to learn from your peers.”

Mike is currently the Past President of the Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts and hosts several educational conservational workshops at his farm. He has also won several awards for conservation along with being named an Indiana Master Farmer in 2014. Our family and I have been blessed and called to continue the legacy started by our parents and grandparents to carry on a true “family farm.” “My legacy as a conservationist farmer is to improve and protect the borrowed living soil that God has given us and to keep our water clean and pure as the raindrops that fall from the sky.”

10:05 am – Richards Rm 1 – 2016 Year In Review, From Record Drought To Record Yields, Learnings And Plans For 2017

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Deb Campbell, Agronomy Advantage; Melody Robinson, Clark Agri Service; Johanna Burrows, Cargill

These agronomists from different regions will give a cross province perspective on questions from the 2016 season, and how to prepare for 2017.

Deb obtained her BSc Agronomy with emphasis in soil management from the University of Guelph. She then went on to complete her Certified Crop Adviser certification in 2000. Recently Deb completed Licensed Seed Crop Inspection training and is now certified. She also served on Certified Crop Adviser Board of Directors from 2009-2011. Deb has a wide variety of experience from working for Cargill and Syngenta in an array of positions. From Agronomist to Territory Sales Manager to Account Manager, she understands all aspects of growing a successful crop both in the field and in the chequebook. She has production expertise in corn, soybeans (including IP), cereals, canola, edible beans, alfalfa, and cover crops. Deb owns and operates Agronomy Advantage. d.campbell.agronomy@gmail.com

Melody Robinson holds a Master’s Degree in Weed Science from the University of Guelph as well as a BSc in Plant Biology.  She received her CCA-ON designation in 2014 and just recently completed her 4R Nutrient Management Specialty. Currently, Melody works for Clark Agri Service, a family-owned retail business located in the heart of the Niagara Peninsula.  She splits her time between running the scouting program and offering product and sales support to growers.  She serves as a director for the Niagara South SCIA and in her spare time enjoys hiking and camping. mrobinson@clarkagriservice.com

Johanna recently graduated from the University of Guelph with a degree in Environmental Sciences, and took on the role of Agronomy Associate with Cargill in Harriston. Although she has been in the workforce for a short period of time, she has spent the past 5 growing seasons helping farmers to make integrated pest management decisions in Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. She has experience with a wide range of crops from soybeans to lentils, and has a keen eye for quantifying insect thresholds. Johanna enjoys learning about regional variations in crop production and has developed a passion for identifying plants thanks to her participation in the North Eastern Weed Science Competition. Her favourite activity is being outside and on her feet, be it in the field or in the forest.

10:05 am – Crop Science, Rm 116 – Grain Storage: is it your weakest link?

Dyck 1-1.jpgJames Dyck, OMAFRA

Hard work got your crop into the bin.  Don’t let its value disappear in storage! Learn five key ways to preserve crop quality so you get top dollar at delivery.

James Dyck is the Engineering Specialist for Field Crop Systems and Environment with OMAFRA, based in Vineland.  He works on projects related to grain handling, storage and drying, and precision agriculture.  He was raised on a cash crop and livestock farm in the Niagara Region, and he earned a Mechanical Engineering degree in 2011 from the University of Waterloo

11:10 am – Crop Science  – Crop Residue Management Matters and Starts on the Combine!

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James Dyck, OMAFRA and Greg Stewart, Maizex Seeds

Don’t overlook what’s left behind!  Today’s high-yield crops produce more residue than ever.  Find out why residue management matters, what tools to use and where to start.

James Dyck is the Engineering Specialist for Field Crop Systems and Environment with OMAFRA, based in Vineland.  He works on projects related to grain handling, storage and drying, and precision agriculture.  He was raised on a cash crop and livestock farm in the Niagara Region, and he earned a Mechanical Engineering degree in 2011 from the University of Waterloo

Greg Stewart was born and raised on a farm near Peterborough, Ontario.  He attended the University of Guelph and worked there as a research assistant. Stewart worked for OMAFRA as the Corn Specialist for 17 years.  In 2015 he left OMAFRA to join Maizex Seeds as an agronomist.

11:10 am – Rozanski 2 – Lessons Learned About Planting into Lush Green Cover from a Veteran  No-tiller

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Lucas Criswell, Pennsylvania

The soil health time line of how we progressed to where we are today; striving  to be innovative in finding solutions for issues on our farm!

Veteran No tiller  that grew up on a moldboard plow . Chasing my dad round after round. Getting a dirt tan to prove it. My dad adopted notill in the mid 80s on corn and then soybeans in the early 90s. Never satisfied with status quo .  Cover crops came in the mid 90s off and on but became mandatory because of what I saw on my own operation.

11:10 am – Rozanski 1  and 3:40 pm – Rozanski 2 – Wheat-delivering unique profit in your rotation-An Irish perspective.

david-sDavid Shortall, Agronomist, Cargill AgHorizons

2016 delivered exceptional wheat yields. Often called “poverty grass”, wheat, managed properly will provide financial, rotational and biomass returns. A farm study will show the true benefits of growing wheat.

David Shortall is an Agronomist with Cargill Ltd. Originally from Ireland, he has extensive experience managing cereal crops in one of the highest yielding environments in the world. From a cereal and grain farm, he graduated with a degree in Agribusiness from University College Dublin in 2010.

11:10 am – Richards Rm 2 – A New Way to Make Hay for Overseas Markets

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Fritz Trautsmandorff, Chris Martin, Ontario Hay Co-op

The Ontario Hay and Forage Co-operative is working on dryers for big square bales and a 100,000 tonne double compaction facility to ship Ontario hay to markets anywhere in the world. Come learn  about this potential opportunity!

Fritz moved to Canada from Austria in 1980 to start dairy farming in the Jerseyville area of Wentworth Cty. He transitioned to a hay and grains operation that now covers 2000+ acres. He has actively exported hay and built a hay compaction facility at the farm. Recently he has with other producers developed a Hay Cooperative to explore ways of Ontario participating in the export hay market with a higher quality and volume of product. Fritz is active in many farm related organizations provincially and nationally.

Chris Martin was raised on a dairy/potato farm on the edge of St. Jacobs. In his years at home he developed a keen interest in dairy as well as growing forages.
In the fall of 2006 with extra hay to sell and a flat local market Chris looked for alternatives in the export market to the US. Today Chris along with his brother Scott and there family’s own and operate Marhaven Agri Inc. The main focus of the 800 acres they farm is growing quality hay for the US market. They ship 1500 ton / year into eastern seaboard in large square bales. Chris is also a founding member of the Ontario Hay and Forage Co-op and also represents the US exporters on the Canadian Forage & Grassland Association board.

2:25 pm – Rozanski 1 – Corn Production Practices for Profit

 2016_ben_rosser_jpg  2016_Peter%20Johnson_Agronomist_jpg
Ben Rosser, OMAFRA
Peter Johnson, Real Agriculture

P&K management, strip till, intensive management practices, plant green and MORE… Peter and Ben will highlight key findings from recent Ontario research projects.

Ben Rosser is the Corn Industry Program Lead with OMAFRA based out of the Crop Science building at the University of Guelph. Ben’s previous role was working as a technician in the same program, and has been involved in applied research projects investigating nitrogen rate and application methods, tillage and residue management, starter fertilizers, and the use of different precision agriculture technologies.

Peter is the agronomist for RealAgriculture.com that loves to talk WHEAT!  His weekly update, “Wheat Pete’s Word”, gives timely tips and answers to questions that growers ask. Peter is a strong advocate of social media opportunities and the value it brings to agriculture.  In particular, he utilizes Twitter, @WheatPete, and videos agronomic tips through RealAgriculture.com  Peter was the Provincial Cereal Specialist, part of the Field Crop team, with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs for 30 years (retired 2015). Peter was an integral part of developing the SMART Wheat program that has significantly increased Ontario wheat yields. His specialties are cereal crops, production systems, fertility management, conservation tillage (no-till), cover crops and site specific management. Peter and his family operate a small farm near Lucan.  This is where the “rubber hits the road”!

2:35 pm – Rozanski 2 – Make Wheat Great Again: The Potential of Perennial Wheat

Dr. Jamie Larsen, Research Scientist, Perjlarsenennial Cereals, Fall Rye and Winter Triticale Breeding, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre

This session will discuss environmental, economic and social benefits of perennial wheat. The audience will be challenged to think about the potential of this crop on their farm.

Dr. Larsen is a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada based at the Lethbridge Research Centre in Lethbridge, Alberta. He received his Ph.D. in Plant Agriculture with a focus on wheat breeding from the University of Guelph in 2012. His research focuses on developing perennial wheat, perennial cereal rye, fall rye and winter triticale for grain and livestock producers with the goal of maximizing the sustainability of cereal production systems. To initiate the development of perennial cereals, Dr. Larsen’s research group is completing wide crosses between perennial grasses and annual cereals (wheat and rye) and advancing breeding lines using traditional plant breeding methods. His lab is also using advanced genomic approaches to work towards understanding the genetics of perennial habit in grass species closely related to wheat and rye. His research group also works on several agronomic projects that focus on benchmarking productivity and best management practices for perennial cereals.

2:35 pm – Crop Science, Rm 116 – Crops vs Weeds! Who Wins?

2017_clarence_swantonClarence Swanton, U of G

Genetic advancement is beginning to  improve the ability of our crops to compete with weeds. This has been a long standing goal for weed scientists.  Have we reached that goal? What are the possibilities for the future?

Dr. Swanton obtained his BSc in Botany from the University of Toronto, His MSc in Agrometerology from the University of Guelph, and a PhD in Plant Ecology from the University of Western Ontario. His research is focussed on weed ecology and the development of integrated weed management systems for field and horticultural crops.

2:35 pm – Crop Science Rm 121 – FCC Digital Tools Demonstrated; Field Manager Pro and AgExpert

2017_steve_liebelSteve Liebel, FCC

Field Manager Pro is better business planning for your operation. You can manage your fields in a whole new way. AgExpert Analyst accounting software makes managing your farm finances and recording transactions easier from anywhere. Come see a demo of each of these tools.

Steve Liebel was raised on a wheat farm just outside of Regina, SK where he helped with the family farm while attending the University of Regina to obtain his Bachelor’s Degree in Business. Steve went on to work in the telecommunications sector for 17 years developing a strong interest in technology and a passion for mobile apps. In 2015, Steve joined FCC’s Management Software division where his experience in agriculture and software development is being combined to help producers better manage their operations.

3:40 pm – Rozanski 1 – Drought Stress and Ontario Soybean Yields: Unravelling the Mystery

2016_Horst_Bohner_OMAFRA_jpg   2017_hugh_earl

Horst Bohner, OMAFRA and Hugh Earl UG

How much soybean yield is typically lost to soil water deficits, and why are those crop responses so inconsistent?   What can we do to protect soybean yield potential when we can’t count on the rain?

Horst Bohner has been the provincial Soybean Specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs since 2001.  He works closely with producers and researchers to address soybean production issues.  His responsibilities include field research validation, improving production techniques, and providing soybean information to Ontario growers. Horst is past chair of the Ontario Oil and Protein Seed Crop Committee and the OMAFRA representative for the Heartland Regional Soil and Crop Improvement Association. He is a Certified Crop Advisor.  Previous to working for OMAFRA he conducted field research trials with various crops including corn, soybeans, wheat, canola, tomatoes, apples, and grapes.  He was raised and worked on a cash crop farm near Woodstock Ontario so he’s familiar with the opportunities and challenges faced by Ontario producers.

Dr. Hugh Earl is an Associate Professor of Crop Physiology at the University of Guelph, and the Chair of the Department of Plant Agriculture.  He received his PhD from the University of Guelph in 1998 and then spent five years as a faculty member at the University of Georgia before returning to Canada in 2003.  He conducts research in the areas of oilseeds agronomy (canola, soybean) and the physiological basis of yield determination in field crops, with particular emphasis on tolerance of drought stress in soybean.  As a cop physiologist, Dr. Earl’s research focusses primarily on canopy (i.e. plant community)-scale processes, to understand how advances in plant breeding and genetics can translate into yield improvement at the field level.  He has served as an editor for the international journal Crop Science, and as the canola variety trials coordinator for the Ontario Soybean and Canola Committee.

3:40 pm – Crop Science Rm 121 – Turn Your Data into Knowledge with 3rd Party Apps

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Dennis Jansen, John Deere           Kaye McLagan, Premier Equipment

Investigate how data portals, such as the John Deere Operations Center, let you partner with many third party organizations through the use of innovative apps to maximize returns on your data and profitability of your operation.

Dennis is a Solutions Specialist with John Deere Canada ULC covering Southern and Central Ontario. In this role, Dennis works to support precision farming technologies and agricultural equipment offered by John Deere. Dennis holds a B.Comm in Food and Agricultural Business from the University of Guelph.

Kaye McLagan is the Integrated Solutions Data Lead at Premier Equipment Ltd. Kaye grew up in Perth County on her family’s Dairy and Cash Crop Farm. She is a 2013 University of Guelph graduate. She was a Field Technician for OMAFRA for 4 summers, working with the Wheat, Canola, Edible Bean and Soybean Specialists. After University, Kaye was hired on by Premier Equipment as their Data Coordinator. She manages the Dealership’s telematics and GPS accuracy subscriptions and works with new technologies such as the Soil Information System, PurePixel and GreenSeeker. Kaye works with many different data platforms including Trimble Ag Software, SMS, Field View, Apex and Operations Center. One of her focuses is making data work with an Operation, no matter the brand of machine.

3:40 pm – Rozanski 5 – Growing and Using Switchgrass and Miscanthus

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Jake DeBruyn, OMAFRA

James Fisher, Fidale Farms
David Smith, Norfolk Cty

The Ontario Biomass Producers Co-op presents an interesting session featuring switchgrass and miscanthus growers and users talking about why they’re making the switch to biomass crops.  Switchgrass and miscanthus markets continue to expand, both in conventional markets like livestock bedding and feed, in premium markets like no-spray/organic and ginseng, and in the bioeconomy for bio-based pots, other plastics and biochemicals.  This session will present the agronomic basics for farmers to understand how to get started growing biomass crops within their existing operation, and will also provide details from users discussing the end-use markets.

Jamie Fisher is the President of the Ontario Biomass Producers Co-operative.  He runs a mixed operation near Carlisle Ontario including switchgrass production, hay primarily for the horse market, and beef cattle.

Jake DeBruyn is an agricultural engineer at OMAFRA, based in the Guelph office. His areas of focus include biomass crops, green energy and climate change.  Jake DeBruyn is an professional engineer working at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs as the Engineering Specialist, New Technology Integration.  He’s previously held roles as the On-farm Wastewater and Water Technology Engineer, and the Rural Environment Engineer.  Jake DeBruyn has a B.Sc.(Bio.E) and M.Sc. (Bio.E) from the University of Manitoba.
David Smith, has been farming in Norfolk County since 1976.  For the last 30 years he has been operating a bio-fueled, hydroponic greenhouse, as well as one hundred acres of field crops.  David is an early adopter of purpose grown biomass and for the past six years has been growing and propagating miscanthus.  With the support of Growing Forward 2 he is developing innovative mechanical systems to improve the establishment process of future miscanthus acreage. David is a Director of the Ontario Biomass Producers Co-operative and REAP-Canada.

Financial

9:00 am – Richards Rm 2 – Can You Afford That New Equipment?


Jomolenhuis_john_omaf_2014_jpghn MolenTews Falls, Hamilton ONhuis, Dave McLeod OMAFRA

Buying machinery in these uncertain times can have a big impact on your bottom line.  When you’re a small to medium sized farmer how can you pencil out these machinery purchases?  Or can you?

John has been with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs as the Business Analysis and Cost of Production Program Lead for the past 14 years. In this role he has authored the Budgeting Farm Machinery Costs and Guide to Custom Farmwork Rates factsheets and leads cost of production and financial benchmarking projects.

John has a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Business from the University of Guelph. John grew up on a farrow-to-finish hog operation outside of Strathroy, Ontario and now lives in Brighton with his wife and four children.
Dave McLeod is the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs’ Business Finance Specialist, with the ministry’s Business Management Unit.  Areas of focus in Dave’s role as Business Finance Specialist are agricultural taxation, financing arrangements and business structures.  Dave holds a bachelor of commerce degree from the University of Guelph and has been with the ministry for more than 16 years, working in media relations, issues management and business management.

10:05 am – Richards Rm 2 –  To Invest or Not to Invest

Jomolenhuis_john_omaf_2014_jpghn MolenTews Falls, Hamilton ONhuis, Dave McLeod OMAFRA

As a small to medium sized business, what factors should you take into account when considering long-term capital investment in your farm operation.
John has been with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs as the Business Analysis and Cost of Production Program Lead for the past 14 years. In this role he has authored the Budgeting Farm Machinery Costs and Guide to Custom Farmwork Rates factsheets and leads cost of production and financial benchmarking projects.
John has a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Business from the University of Guelph. John grew up on a farrow-to-finish hog operation outside of Strathroy, Ontario and now lives in Brighton with his wife and four children.
Dave McLeod is the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs’ Business Finance Specialist, with the ministry’s Business Management Unit.  Areas of focus in Dave’s role as Business Finance Specialist are agricultural taxation, financing arrangements and business structures.  Dave holds a bachelor of commerce degree from the University of Guelph and has been with the ministry for more than 16 years, working in media relations, issues management and business management.

12:15 pm – Crop Science, Rm 116 – Making Land Leases Work for You and Your Landlord

Mike Strang, Exeter;  Jim Patton, Alliston;  Dave McEachren, Glencoe
We all know our land leases need to be addressed. This session will give you important tips to Improve farm land leases so that they benefit landlords, tenants and the soil.
Strang are fourth and fifth generation farmers working 1800 acres near Exeter, Ontario. Strang Farms is faced with the familiar challenge of growing a financially viable business that the next generation will be proud to continue. Employing conservation farming practices with the latest crop sciences and advanced technologies is our growth strategy.
Mike Strang holds a B.Sc. in Agronomy from the University of Guelph, is a member of the Innovative Farmers Assoc. of Ontario, and a specialist in pest control and precision farming practices. As a guest speaker at conferences and through his community involvement, Mike shares his ideas about emerging technologies and best practices.
Geoff Strang worked as a laser robotics engineer in the automotive industry where he built a strong reputation as an expert in his field. He is now the Robot Farmer. Geoff provides laser and robotic consulting and troubleshooting services off-farm, and makes Mike’s newfangled ideas into realities on the farm. Family patriarch, Keith Strang, farms with his sons and is active as a member of the board for a local co-operative.
Jim and his wife Martha farm north west of Alliston near Everett Ontario. We have 2 boys David 12 and Jacob 10 and work with my parents Doug and Lorene Patton.  Grew up on a cow/calf, feedlot operation in the “dirty” 80’s and “dismal”90’s. Graduated a 98A from Guelph and made a change that spring. We now own and operate a hatching egg operation as well as a breeder grower operation north of where we live. We also cash crop corn, soys and wheat on both our acres and my parents acreage. We do all our own excavation, harvesting, trucking, planting etc. We now only hire out our spray application and top dress application. We are all about business. Chicken or otherwise. Soil health, bird health, synergy between livestock and crop. We work hard and play hard too.
Dave2017_Dave_Eachren.jpg operates McEachren Model Centre Farms Inc., a 450 acre grain farm and along with his father and uncle operate a total of 2300 acres of corn, soybeans and winter wheat, in the Glencoe area.  They have been no-tilling the 3 main commodities for over 25 years now and Dave has been incorporating cover crops on 100% on the acres under his management.  Dave is also a Director on the Grain Farmer’s of Ontario, Innovative Farmers Association of Ontario and Farm & Food Care Ontario.  In his spare time, Dave enjoys collecting and researching the history of Deere & Co. and is a volunteer firefighter in Glencoe, ON.

3:40 pm – Richards Rm 2 – Tax Planning Revisited

Franklinffranklinn H. Famme, BBA, C.Mgr, CPA, CA

What is changing in taxation of farming? This session will provide practical advice and information on taxation of quotas, capital gains exemption limits, and things to watch for 2017.

Franklin Famme is a senior officer and director of Famme & Co. Professional Corporation, a chartered professional accounting firm with offices in Stratford, St. Mary’s and London.  Famme & Co. has been a pillar of the business community in Stratford for 70 years with its strengths lying in a talented staff compliment and its commitment to the community.

11:10 am – Rozanski 5 – Emergency Action: What To Do And Not Do After Calling 911

board group and headshotsDean Anderson, B.Sc. P.Ag.  Strategic Advisor – Agriculture, Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS) dean.anderson@wsps.ca

Do you know what to do if you have an incident that requires emergency action on your farm? Do you have an emergency plan? Have you taken a first aid course, do you and your workers know how to contact emergency services and describe where the incident has occurred to not delay services?

Dean Anderson received his B Sc (Agriculture) from the University of Guelph, Ontario.  He has years of experience conducting research and project management in crop protection.  Dean has worked with the major crops in the agricultural regions of eastern and western Canada and the United States.  Mr. Anderson has been working in agriculture occupational health and safety for over 17 years and is currently the Strategic Advisor Agriculture Initiatives, at WSPS

Dean is currently Chair of the Rural Ontario Institute, Chair of the Ontario Institute of Agriculture and Vice-Chair for the FarmSafe Foundation. He serves on numerous committees nationally and provincially, including the CSA Ag Equipment Technical Committee and Ministry of Labour Farming Technical Advisory Committee. Further, he is also currently is the Treasurer (past chair) of Canadian Agriculture Safety Association

2:35 pm – Rozanski 5 – Ag Labour: Your Responsibilities for a Safer Workplace

board group and headshotsDean Anderson, B.Sc. P.Ag.  Strategic Advisor – Agriculture, Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS)

Do you hire labour on your farming operation? Do you know what your rights and responsibilities are under the Occupation Health and Safety Act.  Are you aware of new requirements such as mandatory worker awareness and changes to the noise exposure regulations?

Women in Agriculture – Rozanski 4

9:00 am – Working On The World Stage

2017_nicole_mackellarNicole McKeller, GFO

Hear Nicole share lessons she has learned about earning respect as a young female in male dominated industries. From Canada’s only major league baseball team, to travelling the globe promoting Ontario grains and oilseeds, hear how to earn respect from the toughest critic.

Nicole Mackellar is the Manager, Market Development for Grain Farmers of Ontario. She obtained her Honours B.A from McMaster University specializing in Economics and Psychology. Nicole has worked in the marketing industry for the past 10 years including the past 6 in agriculture where she works to define strategic opportunities for Ontario barley, corn, oats, soybeans and wheat. She is a 2017 Nuffield Scholar and is a member of the Canadian Agri-Marketing Association.  As part of her responsibilities Nicole works on the promotion of Ontario grains in export markets. She has participated in several international trade missions to South America, Europe, Japan and South East Asia to foster relationships with importers and processors.  Prior to joining Grain Farmers of Ontario, Nicole worked in the Sports Marketing industry for 4 years with Canada’s only major league baseball team.  Nicole is a member of her family’s row crop farm in Southwestern Ontario growing, corn, oats, soybeans and wheat.

10:05 am – Prioritizing Positive Relationships

2016_Joanna_Follings_OMAFRA_jpgJoanna Follings, OMAFRA

A personal perspective on the importance of building and maintaining positive relationships and partnerships in both your personal and professional life, and their impact on your success.

Prior to her role as an OMAFRA Cereals Specialist, Joanna worked as a Research Analyst at OMAFRA for ministry funded research and innovation programs and with the Agricultural Adaptation Council (AAC) where she managed a wide range of AAC funded research projects. She has also worked with the agricultural input companies of E.I. Dupont Canada and BASF.  Joanna completed her Master of Science degree in Weed Science from the University of Guelph and continues to be involved in her family dairy and cash crop farm in Ayr, Ontario.

11:10 am – Farming Together and Sharing the Load: Couples Panel

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Sandi & Mark Brock, Staffa; Amy & Adam Petherick, Campbellford

Two couples at different points in their careers, with different approaches to managing joint crop and livestock ventures.  How they make it work and balance the workload.

Mark and Sandi together with their children Jack and Jessica own and operate Shepherd Creek Farms in Staffa, ON.  There, they raise crops on 1600 acres, and a flock of 500 sheep.  Though they work together in decisions and operations for both enterprises, Mark is point person on the cropping side, and Sandi on the livestock side.  Mark and Sandi are also very active in the agriculture industry.  Mark is currently the Chair for Grain Farmers of Ontario, Chair of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Crops and Vice-Chair for the Canadian Grains Council.  Sandi is currently the secretary for the local Sheep Producer district, a director for Farm and Food Care Ontario, and an active 4-H volunteer in Perth County.

Adam and wife, Amy, in partnership with his parents, Evan and Marilyn, milk 54 cows in a head to head bank barn in Campbellford, Ontario. The 350 acre, 2-time Master Breeder operation in Northumberland County is home to 41 Holsteins and 12 Jerseys, with a current classification of 8 EX, 34 VG, and 18 GP, with a current herd BCA of 253-263-257. The herd averages eight generations of VG or EX dams, with some animals as high as twelve generations. Since returning from university, with the support of his parents, Adam has initiated and overseen many changes to the farm, such as the dairy barn renovation completed in 2009 which saw a 50 X 120 foot tarp barn and an open front heifer barn built. He has also increased the farm’s quota holdings by 50%, adopted herd management software on the farm, switched the herd to a TMR based ration, and has invested in more labour saving automation like an automatic calf feeder.

12:15 pm –  Walking the Tightrope

017_ Amy_cronin.jpgAmy Cronin, Bluevale

As a passionate agricultural enthusiast, Amy works to balance a large family, a growing farm business on both sides of the border, extensive community involvement and industry leadership. Holding it all together requires energy, a fantastic support system, and a belief in collaborating to make things better.

Amy Cronin is a mother of six children, hog producer, and a business owner in Huron County, Ontario. Amy and her husband Mike were chosen as the Outstanding Young Farmers for Ontario in March, 2015 and for Canada in November, 2015. Amy has been the Chair of the Ontario Pork Board of Directors since 2012, where she brings the wealth of her experience of the North American hog market to the table. She served as Chair of the Ontario Agriculture Sustainability Coalition in 2012 and 2013, and actively participates in the Presidents’ Council, Grow Ontario Together and other provincial initiatives.  In 2015 Amy co-chaired the Ontario Agri-Food Growth Strategy with the deputy minister of agriculture.  As an engaged community member, Amy is a Huron-Perth Catholic School Board Trustee, and is the chair of the Catholic Community Foundation of Southwestern Ontario. She is a graduate of both the Advanced Agricultural Leadership Program (AALP) and Canadian Total Excellence In Agricultural Management (CTEAM). Amy’s commitment to family, farm, industry and community fuels her passion for making the world a better place to be!

2:35 pm – Farm Leadership – Feeding a Growth Mindset

2017_Carly_OBrien.jpgCarly O’Brien, Intrigue Media

Thinking about ways to protect and preserve the energy and stamina it takes to grow and farm each year. Learn practical techniques, interesting concepts and fun tools to use during your farm day to maintain a positive outlook and forward momentum.

Empowering Leaders to Strengthen Communities. That is what Carly, and the team at Intrigue Media, do as they help organizations clarify their message and get noticed by the people with whom they want to be connected.  Carly draws on her experience as a professional facilitator, a former farm kid, Guelph business leader,  Past Chair of the Guelph Chamber of Commerce and current mom to two (likely) UofG grads.

Marketing

2:35 pm – Richards Rm 2 – Your Marketing Plan. This is where the Market is!  Now What?

Don Kabbes, General Manager, Great Lakes Grain

A quick look at world and domestic markets and quickly digest to build a marketing plan that works and can be executed with ease.

Don has worked for the Co-op System in Ontario his entire Career.  He has held many positons including Branch Manager, Agronomy Manager, Market Development manager and now General Manager for Great Lakes Grain.  Don has a passion for Agriculture and is deeply involved in his local Ag Community.  Don operates a small cash crop farm near Brigden with his two grown son Jeff and Luke.

10:05 am – Rozanski 1 – Marketing Outlook: Managing Risk in an ever changing world!

Justin Merner, Grain Manager Eastern Canada

Join one of Ontario’s grain merchants for a look at current market trends and managing risk for the upcoming season.

Justin was born and raised on a dairy farm just outside of Zurich Ontario. Before coming to Cargill he was a financial specialist focusing on personal and business pension plans. He joined Cargill 12 years ago occupying a number of rolls in merchandising/trading and risk management. Justin is married to his wife Tina and they have 3 young boys that keeps life interesting in Lucan Ontario.

3:40 pm – Crop Science, Rm 116 – Tapping Income Potential With The Maple In Your Woodlot

2016_Nick_Betts_OMAFRA_jpgNick Bretts, Business Management Specialist, OMAFRA

Do you have a woodlot? Interested in making it more productive? This session highlights multiple avenues to bring in income from your woodlot with maple syrup. Teaser: some options don’t cost you any time or money!

Nick is the Business Management Specialist with OMAFRA. He has over 10 years of experience leading projects with farmers, agribusiness and other partners, delivering environmental programs, market development and conducting research.  Prior to OMAFRA, Nick as worked with Grain Farmers of Ontario and OSCIA, developing partnerships and initiatives related to sustainability in agriculture. Nick studied his undergrad at University of Guelph and holds an M.B.A in leadership and sustainability from University of Cumbria (UK).

12:15 pm – Crop Science Rm 121  – Navigating Cost Share Applications

Margaret May, OSCIA2016_margaret_may_jpeg

Everyone gets frustrated with the details surrounding cost share programs. Take advantage of Margaret’s know-how on where to find them, which ones you qualify for, and how to complete the applications properly and send them in on time!

Margaret May has been involved with program delivery with OSCIA since 1987.  She is an outstanding presenter, skilled communicator and is highly respected in the farm community for her knowledge of agricultural issues.  She brings real life  agricultural experience to the table, as her family operates a beef, sheep and cash  crop farm in SW Ontario.  She has excellent rapport with growers.  As Regional Program Lead with OSCIA, she is keen to discuss Growing Forward 2 and other programs and how they can impact ur farm business.

Environment

9:00 am – Crop Science 116 – Climate Change and Ontario Agriculture

Adam Hayes & Christoph Wand, OMAFRA

Climate change poses risks, challenges and opportunities for agriculture. Discussion will cover the science and impacts of the changing climate, policy tools such as carbon pricing and the role of Ontario agriculture.
Christoph received his Bachelor of Science (Nutritional Sciences) and Master of Science (Animal Science – Ruminant Nutrition) from the University of Guelph.   Christoph joined OMAFRA in 1998 as the Beef Cattle and Sheep Nutritionist.  He began his most recent work assignment as Livestock Sustainability Specialist in August of 2014, and is based out of the Elora OMAFRA office.  His previous technical work in nutrition was focused on economic sustainability including labour reduction, feed and nutrient use efficiency, alternative forages, GHG mitigation and most recently value chains.  Christoph has been on several national and industry-led committees and in 2014 he was appointed an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Animal and Poultry Science recognizing his involvement at the Ontario Agriculture College.

10:05 – Rozansk 2 – “To 4R or Not to 4R?” Is there an option?

Dale Cowan, Agris Coop
Dan Buttenham, OABA

The Triple bottom line of the 3 sustainability pillars of Economic Environmental and Social are part of the systems approach to improving farm practices. It starts with identifying areas for improvement, choosing performance indicators and create a 4 R plan, implement, record, and evaluate. Then take responsibility for the outcomes learn, adjust and adopt a continuous improvement attitude.

Dale is an 39 year veteran of Ontario Agriculture. A major advocate for Precision Ag technologies that offer insight beyond the obvious. Supporter of the 4 R Nutrient Stewardship Program in Ontario obtained his 4 R NMS certification in 2016 from CCA Ontario. Can always be found on or near on the leading edge of emerging technologies.

12:15 pm – Richards Rm 1 – Nutrient Applications in the Growing Season and Beyond”……..

Ms. Chris Brown, Nutrient Management Specialist, OMAFRA, christine.brown1@ontario.ca
Ken Prince, Cadman Power Equipment Limited

Applying manure in the growing seasons and the opportunities this can provide, including, improved nutrient use and crop uptake, reduced risk of nutrient losses and runoff, expanded window of opportunity for application.  Additionally, consider the advancements in technology and equipment for this opportunity.

Ken Prince has been in the manure industry for over 30 years in the capacity of product management, operations management and engineering management. Ken specializes in liquid waste equipment, he has designed and brought to market municipal waste, agriculture, and septic waste equipment. Working with tankers, injectors, and drag line manure equipment. On the side, Ken and his wife enjoy running their family farm. He has an overall passion for manure – including the environmental impact, run-off, pollution, and how to properly utilize the nutrients in manure when injecting into crop. His most recent project that allows for the proper use of nutrients in manure by allowing you to inject into the growing crop, getting you in the field for an additional, 2-month application period.

 12:15 pm – Richards Rm 2 – Soils are Alive! When Biology And Agronomy Meet

2017_lori_philip   2016_jake_munroe_jpg
Lori Phillips, AAFC

Jake Munroe, OMAFRA

Soils are the most complex ecosystem on the planet, inhabited by billions of diverse microorganisms. Learn how soil life can be managed to maximize agricultural profitability and sustainability.

Dr. Lori Phillips is a Research Scientist in soil microbiology with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), in Harrow Ontario. She specialises in plant-microbe-soil interactions. Dr. Phillips obtained her Ph.D. in the Soil Science Department at the University of Saskatchewan and, after 5 years as a Research Scientist with the Victorian Department of Primary Industries in Australia, she joined AAFC in September 2015.
Her research program at AAFC investigates the diversity and function of soil microbes (bacterial, fungal, and archaeal) that support agro-ecosystem productivity. Current projects investigate how agricultural practices affect the microbial processes that underpin nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) cycling, soil carbon turnover, and greenhouse gas emissions, and how microbial communities in turn affect agricultural sustainability and profitability. She is also working to establish baselines for microbial biodiversity in Ontario, seeking to understand which best management practices help build diverse and resilient communities of these critical ecosystem service providers.
Jake Munroe is the Soil Fertility Specialist for the Field Crops Unit of OMAFRA. Jake holds a Bachelor of Science from Acadia University and a Master’s degree in Physical Geography from the University of Toronto. He has expertise in soil fertility and soil microbiology. Through field days, plot demonstrations and presentations Jake has shared information with Ontario producers on soil fertility, soil health, and best management practices for nutrients.

Organic Amendments – Crop Science Rm 121

9:00 am – Making Best Use of Organic Amendments: A Farmer Panel

2017_steve_Eastep.jpg
Steven Eastep, Elora

Jim Patton, Alliston
Steve Sickle, St. George

Farmers will discuss the different materials they use, how to maximize benefits, and how to manage amendments responsibly.

Steven Eastep is a farmer in Elora, Ontario, Wellington County.  Steven and  his wife, Sandra, operate Eastep Farms Limited, which is a Broiler Poultry  and Cash Crop operation.  Eastep Farms has chosen to use bio solids as a  soil amendment since 1996.  Steven has been involved in a number of farm  organizations in the past and has served as the President of the Ontario  Soil & Crop Improvement Association in 2004.  Steven and Sandra have and  continue to enjoy world-wide travelling.

Jim and his wife Martha  farm north west of Alliston near Everett Ontario. We have 2 boys David 12 and Jacob 10 and work with my parents Doug and Lorene Patton.  Grew up on a cow/calf, feedlot operation in the “dirty” 80’s and “dismal”90’s. Graduated a 98A from Guelph and made a change that spring. We now own and operate a hatching egg operation as well as a breeder grower operation north of where we live. We also cash crop corn, soys and wheat on both our acres and my parents acreage. We do all our own excavation, harvesting, trucking, planting etc. We now only hire out our spray application and top dress application. We are all about business. Chicken or otherwise. Soil health, bird health, synergy between livestock and crop. We work hard and play hard too.

Farming 800 acres all no till and every acre went into the winter and different stages of green. Use 400000 Gallons of liquid and 800 tonne of solid manure a year along with municipal compost, sewage sludge and leaf and yard compost as well. All manure is now surface applied at lower rates to energize the soils microbiology instead of higher rates that kill it.  I have seen an excellent synergy with amendments and cover crops

10:05 – Organic Amendment Options: What’s your Best Fit?

Christine Brown, OMAFRA
There are pros and cons to each organic amendment material. Get an overview of each product and meet with many of the companies who supply these amendments.

11:10 am – Why use Organic Amendments? Ask an Agronomist!

  2016_deb_campbell_jpg   2017_steve_redmond
Deb Campbell, Agronomy Advantage

Steve Redmond, Hensall District Co-op
How do organic amendments fit into soil health management? What are the economics of using organic amendments on your farm? Come learn from the experience of these agronomists.

Deb obtained her BSc Agronomy with emphasis in soil management from the University of Guelph. She then went on to complete her Certified Crop Adviser certification in 2000. Recently Deb completed Licensed Seed Crop Inspection training and is now certified. She also served on Certified Crop Adviser Board of Directors from 2009-2011. Deb has a wide variety of experience from working for Cargill and Syngenta in an array of positions. From Agronomist to Territory Sales Manager to Account Manager, she understands all aspects of growing a successful crop both in the field and in the chequebook. She has production expertise in corn, soybeans (including IP), cereals, canola, edible beans, alfalfa, and cover crops. Deb owns and operates Agronomy Advantage. d.campbell.agronomy@gmail.com

Steve is the Precision Ag Specialist for Hensall District Co-op. He is a Crop Science graduate of the University of Guelph and has held the CCA designation since 1996. His previous experience includes; Research & Development work with DuPont Crop Protection, Technical Service with Cyanamid Crop Protection, Sales for Pioneer Hi-Bred, and Environmental Specialist with OMAFRA. Steve has considerable experience with the Ontario Nutrient Management Act and his role at OMAFRA was to serve as the Biosolids/NASM Specialist when the NASM Regulations were introduced in Ontario. Steve’s 20-year history with organic amendments includes many types of livestock manure, green bin compost and various types of municipal biosolids land applied as both a NASM and as a commercial fertilizer.

General

10:05 am – Rozanski 5 – The Phenomenon of Social Media as a Catalyst for Agricultural Awareness

2017_Amanda_Brodhager.JPGAmanda Brodhagen

Social media engagement created by young farmers and those that are new to agriculture are fueling the desire to know more about farming, resulting in increased ag awareness and uptake from mainstream media. Brodhagen will talk about how to use to social media to connect with consumers, government, media and other farmers

Amanda Brodhagen is a communications professional and part-time beef farmer from Brunner, Ontario. After graduating from the University of Guelph with a B.A. Honours in Political Science, she became the Assistant Editor at Farms.com. She now works for a provincial based farm lobby organization – Ontario Fruit & Vegetable Growers’ Association, farms and writes in her spare time. A self-proclaimed beef advocate, Brodhagen is a graduate of the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders Program (Class of 2014). One of her particular passions is the rural youth organization known as Junior Farmers. She is currently finishing up her term as the Executive Director of Marketing for Junior Farmers’ Association of Ontario, in addition to serving as the Communications Coordinator for the Perth County Junior Farmers. Not only is she a primary producer, working on bringing food from the farm gate to your plate, she is a trained and experienced agricultural advocacy ambassador, and has a passion for narrating the agricultural message through social media to bring awareness and cultivate a greater appreciation for food and farming. She is active on social media and you can follow her on Twitter: @AmandaBrodhagen and Instagram: amanda.brodhagen 

11:10 am – Richards Rm 1 – Whether or Not to Worry About the Weather!

2017_mark_robinsonMark Robinson, Weather Network

Is “normal” weather possible anymore? Hear from  meteorologist from about how weather cycles like the current La Niña impacts production and what we can expect in the 2017 growing season.

Mark Robinson is a Canadian adventurer, storm chaser, and meteorologist.  Recently named as one of Canada’s Top 100 Explorers by Canadian Geographic, he is also a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society.  Mark has chased (and has been chased) by tornadoes across Canada and the United States.  Mark has been intercepting hurricanes since 2005, and has documented many major storms including Katrina, Ike, and Sandy.  He has also chased innumerable ice storms, blizzards and snowstorms.  Mark’s adventurous spirit has taken him around the globe.  He has witnessed avalanches, experienced -110 degrees Celsius temperatures, and jumped into both the Arctic and Southern (Antarctica) Oceans.

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Mark’s love for weather started at a young age and his passion for the weather grew as he got older.  He is a sought after speaker and audiences want to hear about his experiences chasing storms and his adventures around the globe.  The FCC (Farm Credit Canada) also seek Mark’s expertise on how seasonal forecasts and weather will impact their farming season. Mark speaks to students ranging from grade school to university and has had an influence on many people choosing science and weather as a career.

Mark is also an on-air personality at The Weather Network and co-hosts the show “Stormhunters” with his fellow storm chaser and Weather Network meteorologist, Jaclyn Whittal.  When there is active weather, Mark and Jaclyn will often present on air, change into casual clothes, and chase storms well into the night.   Mark is also the host of “Unearthed”.  He is active on social media and you can follow him at @StormhunterTWN

12:15 pm – Rozanski 5 – Emergency Planning for the Whole Farm: Don’t be Caught Unprepared

Ian McDonald, OMAFRA

They will talk about the components of a comprehensive emergency plan to take into account all your farm locations, your assets, whether you work alone or as part of a team and a new app they are developing.

Ian McDonald has been the Applied Research Coordinator for the Field Crops Unit of OMAFRA since 2000 before which he spent 15 years in ag industry as a researcher on new pesticides with Hoechst and Dupont. Since July of 2016 he has been assigned the role of Crop Innovation Specialist with the unit. Ian holds a PhD. In Ag Environmental Science from the University of Guelph. He is involved in the coordination of research and demonstration activities within the OMAFRA Agriculture Development Branch (ADB) Field Crops unit and is involved in scientific review, protocol and project development, data analysis, and reporting amoung other functions within ADB. He works with colleagues and partner organizations to find technology tools to enhance producer and advisor knowledge and access to information through research projects, collaborations with academic and farmer partners, online resources and other outreach opportunities. He is co-chair of the FarmSmart franchise of events. He has a special interest in sustainable agriculture production systems and having the farm sector meet more of societies needs and expectations.

2:35 – Richards Rm 1 – Understanding Food Fraud: The Business Advantage Of Food Integrity,  Panel Discussion

CORY VAN GRONINGEN - VG MEATS.jpg  dr-hanner-uofg  kevin-urbanic-cfia 2017_kelly_mcaslan

Cory Van Groningen, VG Meats (Industry)
Robert Hanner, U of G (Academic)
Kevin Urbanic, CFIA (Government)
Moderator :  Kelly McAslan, Director, Food Safety and Traceability Programs Branch, OMAFRA

This is a double session that continues until 4:30 pm.

Consumers care how their food is produced and where it comes from.
Join industry, academic and government experts to learn how food integrity can build public trust and protect your bottom-line. Interesting examples of food fraud that affect us all will be shared.

Cory Van Groningen is the eldest of 3 brothers Chad, Kyle and Kevin working together in a farm to fork family business. He is the husband of Heidi and father of Brooke, Haley and Ruth. Cory and Heidi were named 2012 Ontario Outstanding Young Farmers. They met at the University of Guelph where Heidi graduated with a Science degree in Animal Agriculture. Cory graduated with a Agricultural Business degree and a Master’s degree in Agricultural Science. Cory serves on the board of Beef Farmers of Ontario, board of Beef Improvement Ontario, the board of Ontario Independent Meat Processors (OIMP), and on his local church council. He has won the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for excellence in contributions to his community. Cory and his family work with over 40 other Ontario Beef Farm Families to deliver the VG Farms brand of beef to Ontario Families. Cory has a journal article published in the Journal of Animal Science.

Robert Hanner is an Associate Professor at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario and Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph. He received his BSc from Eastern Michigan University and PhD from the University of Oregon. He pursued postdoctoral research at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) before joining the American Museum of Natural History as a Curatorial Associate where he spearheading the development of their Ambrose Monell Cryo Collection for Molecular and Microbial Research. Robert then served as Scientific Director of the Coriell Cell Repositories at the Coriell Institute of Medical Research and also served as president of the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). He serves as coordinator for the Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) Campaign, and is the North American Node Representative to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). His research focuses on molecular biodiversity to address both basic and applied research questions, including the role of molecular species recognition in support of food safety and food security objectives.

Kevin earned his Bachelors and Masters of Science in biochemistry and microbiology from the University of Guelph and has spent the past 14 years working for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).  Beginning as a Food Safety Specialist in 2002, Kevin has worked in various inspection and management roles within the Operations Branch.  From 2013-2014, Kevin led the design of the Agency’s new export certification model that will be used by all regulated commodities as the Agency implements its new integrated Agency Inspection Model.  Currently, as Area Chief Inspector, Kevin oversees the Area’s inspection programs as well as Enforcement and Investigation Services.

Kelly McAslan is the Director of the Food Safety and Traceability Programs Branch at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). As part of her portfolio, she is currently co-chairing the Joint industry and government Food Integrity Committee.  Prior to this, Kelly has held other leadership roles within OMAFRA and has worked with industry on initiatives such as animal health and welfare, pollinator health and traceability.  Before OMAFRA, Kelly worked at both the Ministry of Government Services and the Ministry of Transportation where she led transformational change initiatives.

3:40 pm – Rozanski 4 – Is there an Elephant in the Barn? The State of Mental Wellness in Canadian Agriculture

2017_andria_jones_bitton-2Andria Jones-Bitton, U of G

Highlighting findings from a recent study that sheds light on perceived stress, depression, anxiety, burnout, resilience, and attitudes towards help-seeking. Is there a proverbial elephant in the barn? And if so, what do we do about it?

Dr. Andria Jones-Bitton is a veterinarian and Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Population Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. Her research largely centres on food-borne, waterborne and zoonotic diseases, public health, and the epidemiology of mental health and resilience in the agricultural and veterinary sectors.  She uses a mixed research methods approach (quantitative and qualitative) to achieve her research objectives.  Andria loves Canadian agriculture, and is proud to work with Canadian farmers.

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